In the presence of Sunshine.

I've got Sunshine and she's got me. Sometimes, I write, but not nearly enough. Sometimes, I'm smart, but not nearly enough. Always, I am here for you.

(Source: piyox22, via brain-food)

There is a rumour going around that I have found God. I think this is unlikely because I have enough difficulty finding my keys, and there is empirical evidence that they exist.

Terry Pratchett (via noshoes-noworries)

(Source: thedragoninmygarage, via noshoes-noworries)

Dont miss out on something that could be great just because it could also be difficult.

Unknown (via suchvodka)

(Source: for-dayys, via blazinuzumaki)

awildholler:

Sweet corn, grown with no pesticides or herbicides. My field is never tilled. I cover it with horse manure compost every fall, and I cover that with straw. When I weed it by hand, the weeds are left to decompose right in place as a mulch. Squash and beans grow alongside the corn, and everything is planted by hand.
It can be done. We don’t need Monsanto. We need human labor right there, side by side with the plants. We don’t need massive petroleum powered agriculture, we need people working small horticultural plots, gaining knowledge of their specific land and it’s needs. Our land needs to be enclosed by wild space, fecund and full of birds, and bats, and insects, and snakes, and turtles, and all of the other beings that make an ecosystem function.
We can make a desert of the earth in an attempt to get high yields of low quality crops so a few corporations can temporarily get great financial returns, or we can have people spend their days bringing their food into existence, getting in touch with their bio regions, and building healthy soil and ecosystems for generations to come.
It can be done.

awildholler:

Sweet corn, grown with no pesticides or herbicides. My field is never tilled. I cover it with horse manure compost every fall, and I cover that with straw. When I weed it by hand, the weeds are left to decompose right in place as a mulch. Squash and beans grow alongside the corn, and everything is planted by hand.

It can be done. We don’t need Monsanto. We need human labor right there, side by side with the plants. We don’t need massive petroleum powered agriculture, we need people working small horticultural plots, gaining knowledge of their specific land and it’s needs. Our land needs to be enclosed by wild space, fecund and full of birds, and bats, and insects, and snakes, and turtles, and all of the other beings that make an ecosystem function.

We can make a desert of the earth in an attempt to get high yields of low quality crops so a few corporations can temporarily get great financial returns, or we can have people spend their days bringing their food into existence, getting in touch with their bio regions, and building healthy soil and ecosystems for generations to come.

It can be done.

(via earthisalie)

necropticon:

here’s an idea: people shouldn’t actually have to have a job to be allowed to remain alive

(Source: apsychosis, via earthisalie)

opposite-directions:

life is so hard when you have twenty animes to watch

(via resident-tofu)

Like wildflowers; you must allow yourself to grow in all the places people thought you never would.

evwriting

(Source: evwriting, via earthisalie)

We’ve destroyed 90% of the fishes. Coral reefs in the entire planet will be gone in 20 years. That’s an irreversible situation. That’s the first major collapse of an ecosystem on the planet. People are really ecologically stupid. We don’t realize that if we just wipe out a couple of species here, we’re gone.

Paul Watson

(Source: noshoes-noworries, via earthisalie)

(Source: agabella, via earthisalie)

The Sacramento Bee:

Dire predictions about jobs being destroyed spread across California in 2012 as voters debated whether to enact the sales and, for those near the top of the income ladder, stiff income tax increases in Proposition 30. Million-dollar-plus earners face a 3 percentage-point increase on each additional dollar.

“It hurts small business and kills jobs,” warned the Sacramento Taxpayers Association, the National Federation of Independent Business/California, and Joel Fox, president of the Small Business Action Committee.

So what happened after voters approved the tax increases, which took effect at the start of 2013?

Last year California added 410,418 jobs, an increase of 2.8 percent over 2012, significantly better than the 1.8 percent national increase in jobs.

(Source: maxistentialist)